Tag Archives: IDG

Get Your Own Day of the Girl T-Shirt

You can get your own, official International Day of the Girl t-shirt right here!

Step 1 Fill out the t-shirt order form

Step 2 Make a donation to the International Day of the Girl Summit, via our fiscal sponsor, the Working Group on Girls’ Just Give page (all donations go directly to Day of the Girl). Just make a donation for at least $25 and you’ll get the official International Day of the Girl t-shirt!

Note: Choose Int’l Day of the Girl 2016 under Program.

Step 3 Wait 2-3 weeks for your t-shirt to arrive

It’s that easy! And thank you for your support of the Day of the Girl Summit!

Get started.

Please allow 2-3 weeks for your t-shirt to arrive!

International Day of the Girl Movement

We hope you enjoyed an unforgettable International Day of the Girl! It’s not just a day; it’s a movement. Join the IDG Movement today!

If you missed the 2016 Girls Speak Out, you can watch it here! It was amazing and remarkable. Many tell us that they have been changed by this incredible day. Thank you, Working Group on Girls for your hard work, dedication and vision!  #IDG2016 #GirlsSpkOut

The IDG Summit is a movement in support of girls and together, we are changing the world. Join us and add your voice, today!

Day 3 – Activate Her Star Power

Welcome to Day 3 of 11 Days of Action! Thank you, Girls on the Run, in Hunterdon, Bucks & Warren, NJ Counties, for your support!
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Join us and Activate Her #StarPower!

Today, let’s acknowledge the amazing girls and women who have helped us to activate it, because every girl is #BornToShine! Here’s how:

  • Help a girl or woman to activate her #StarPower today, and tell us about it!
  • Tell us about a time when a girl or woman helped you to blow a cloud away from your Star!

Then join our Twitter chat from 11am – 12pm to share your stories of #StarPower!IMG_0349

Born to Shine: showcasing the ways that girls and women help each other to activate  their Star Power, because we are all #GirlsForGirls!

Girls on the Run of Hunterdon, Bucks & Warren Counties envisions a world where every girl knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams.

Here at Girls on the Run, we use a concept called Star Power to help girls to recognize and access that potential.  EIMG_0553very girl has a bright, shining Star inside of herself that makes her unique, strong, and happy.  Negative thoughts, experiences, and obstacles can be like clouds that cover up our Stars and make us feel like less than what we are.  Sometimes, we can activate our Star Power and blow these clouds away on our own, and sometimes we need help.

Let’s activate her #StarPower and share our stories!

Each of us is #BornToShine!

#11DaysofAction, #IDG2016

 

Day 2 – Global Girl Data Movement

The world’s 1.1 billion girls are part of a large and vibrant global generation poised to take on the future. But there is gap in our understanding about girls’ lives and what girls need to succeed in their communities. That’s why UNICEF is calling on the global community to collect, identify, and track progress for girls. They are building a movement for #GirlData!

Here is how you can help! 

On 8 June 2016, Aber Beatrice, 5, photographed in the restaurant that her mother owns in Magri, South Sudan.   “Can you write your name?” Aber asked, “and hers, and hers,” making sure all the names were written down. Then she gave her mother’s telephone number, which she wanted to show she could recall from memory. “I can write my own name, and my mother’s” and then proceeded to put them in the note book. Born in South Sudan just before independence, her family had returned from exile in Uganda where her father had met her mother. Ida spoke with the type of confidence we had discovered in Aber, and an even brighter smile when she spoke of Ida’s future. From the income of the small family restaurant Ida sends Aber to school, and hopes she will even go to university overseas once she has finished high school. “I want to be a doctor” Aber says, and then adds “to help the people here in Magri. We have a doctor in Magri. His name is David. He is a very nice man.”

On 8 June 2016, Aber Beatrice, 5, photographed in the restaurant that her mother owns in Magri, South Sudan.
“Can you write your name?” Aber asked, “and hers, and hers,” making sure all the names were written down. Then she gave her mother’s telephone number, which she wanted to show she could recall from memory. “I can write my own name, and my mother’s” and then proceeded to put them in the note book. Born in South Sudan just before independence, her family had returned from exile in Uganda where her father had met her mother. Ida spoke with the type of confidence we had discovered in Aber, and an even brighter smile when she spoke of Ida’s future. From the income of the small family restaurant Ida sends Aber to school, and hopes she will even go to university overseas once she has finished high school. “I want to be a doctor” Aber says, and then adds “to help the people here in Magri. We have a doctor in Magri. His name is David. He is a very nice man.”

 UNICEF engaged over 2,000,000 young U-Reporters across 30 countries to end violence against girls. Nearly 1,500,000 reported that violence against girls is a problem in their community and 100,000 U-Reporters are acting in their community to stop this violence. Join UNICEF and IDG_Summit in celebrating #IDG2016 and demand #GirlData to show progress for girls in achieving #goal5

-> Join the global girl data movement.

-> Go to Facebook.com/UReportGlobal 

-> Support our Call for Action #GirlData

-> Add your voice to ours! #11DaysofAction #IDG2016

Day 1 – Why a Day for Girls?

It’s Day 1 of 11 Days of Action!
The Working Group on GirlsThank you, 
Working Group on Girls for hosting this very special kick-off day of this historical 11 Days leading up to the 5th Annual International Day of the Girl!

The Working Group on Girls will tell the story of IDG and highlight some of the many reasons why we need a day for girls! Our Girl Advocates and Girl Activists will share their memories and pictures of some of the favorite moments over the past 5 years.

 So don’t miss our Twitter Chat today, October 1, 2016, from 10AM – 2PM ET! Get ready to share your memories, too! And ask questions about how you can get involved with this empowering, influential and important movement in support of Girls’ Global Rights!

 @IDG_Summit and @NGOWGG

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IDG News: IDG Goes GLOBAL!

IDG Cape TownIn honor of the 4th annual International Day of the Girl, we are proud to share the various ways The Grail and other girls’ organizations throughout the world have celebrated this year’s International Day of the Girl.

Join us as we acknowledge what The Grail is doing for the advancement of girls rights WORLDWIDE!

  • Established in 1921, The Grail is a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) committed to building a world of justice and peace through education and action and to standing in solidarity with those who struggle to overcome poverty.

In celebration for this year’s Day of the Girl, The Grail has planned its very own IDG celebrations in a variety of countries including Mexico, South Africa, Brazil, Portugal, Mozambique, Ecuador, Papua New Guinea and Australia.

From October 1-11th, The Grail will work alongside girl advocates and other girls’ rights organizations in the above countries to advance opportunities for girls, and increase awareness of inequality faced by girls worldwide based upon their gender.

IDG SACurrently, The Grail has launched an Open Day in public areas throughout Papua New Guinea to display issues affecting local girls; organized small workshop for girls with motivational talks on guidelines to access opportunities in South Africa; shared food and girl empowering exercises in Ecuador; and organized a school rally to raise public awareness of the different types of discrimination and abuse that many girls suffer from in Mozambique.

On behalf of the Working Group on Girls and everyone on the IDG Summit Team, we would like to extend our greatest appreciation to The Grail and other girls’ rights organizations that continuously work towards the global advancement of the International Day of the Girl agenda. Girls worldwide are one step closer to fairness and equality and we have the members of these organizations to thank.

Thank You.

Together we can change the world!

Girl Power and Gobal Unity

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They walked into the United Nations with a sense of confidence and excitement. They were asked to help welcome attendees to the Girls Speak Out at the United Nations. All three girls, ranging in age from 12 to 16, felt empowered to help the Girls Speak Out shine a light on the global, girl’s point of view.

Julia, the Girl Advocate from Working Group on Girls, and moderator of the Girls Speak Out, welcomed these three girls and made them feel truly welcome.

The girls could tell it was a big deal. And it was. For the first time, the United Nations allowed 500 youth to attend, moderate and WELCOME guests. It was an honor for these girls to have been invited to help and they couldn’t wait.

When they entered the ECOSOC Chamber of the United Nations, their emotions intensified. Humility replaced confidence. Awe replaced excitement. They met the panel of amazing girls who would tell their stories of activism. And in the back of their minds, they started to wonder, “how do I fit in here when these girls are doing such important and amazing things.”

They began greeting the United Nations dignitaries, guests and girls who were excited to attend this ground-breaking event, with friendliness and poise. They passed out the Social Media cards and helped people find the bathroom. And then, when the door opening was delayed for another 15 minutes, they started joking and chatting with the girls in line. They learned about the many different ways that the girls waiting in the hallway were helping advocate for girls’ rights. From the Girl Scouts to groups like Girls Learn International, American Association of University Women, Brave Girls Alliance or even like their own community, iTwixie, they recognized that this group represented a huge and diverse amount of work that was being done around the world, all in support of Girls’ Rights. And they began to feel like they did, indeed, fit in. They felt welcome. And they felt united with everyone that day — in that ECOSOC Chamber of the United Nations, in the hallway waiting to go in, and later in Times Square — because everyone shared a single goal: Girls’ Rights. The message, while simple, was powerful: no matter how a girl’s rights get challenged, girls can advocate for girls and change the world.

Once all guests were allowed in the ECOSOC Chamber of the United Nations, they found a seat to listen to the heart-felt presentations. The words each girl spoke about her need to act and how her action changed her world, again, inspired gratitude and humility. They saw how passionate the girls from the Girls Speak Out were, as the stories spurred the audience to stand up and give 4 standing ovations. Each girl told a story that sparked a realization that each girl has purpose; a voice. They congratulated the girls on the panel for bringing their stories, so impactfully, to the rest of the world and they wished that the day wouldn’t end.

“We need the Day of the Girl because girls really can do anything, if the world wouldn’t be so afraid to let them just do it,” said Julia.

“Girls can do anything boys can do, that’s why we need Day of the Girl,” said Abby.

“When girls get an education and can pursue their dreams, their city, state and country are better off. That’s why we need the Day of the Girl. Every leader needs to know this so that our communities can do a better job of helping all girls succeed. It’s good for communities to invest in girls,” said Madeline.

They said that the 2013 International Day of the Girl changed them and that they each have things they want to speak out about in their community to help make their world better for girls.

How did the 2013 International Day of the Girl change you? Tell us right here and keep the inspiration going!

WISH: Girls Education is about more than just Math and Science

It is clear to many that the girls’ education movement is not only about improving access to education for girls, but also the quality of that education and the empowerment of girls around the globe. At The Daraja Academy of Kenya, it is important to empower and create a well-rounded and confident leader, in addition to an educated girl.

 

In response to the attack on Kenya in Nairobi recently, third year Daraja students created illustrations for peace during their WISH lesson. Mesret’s illustration shows that peace starts within oneself and only then can it be propelled outward.

In response to the attack on Kenya in Nairobi recently, third year Daraja students created illustrations for peace during their WISH lesson. Mesret’s illustration shows that peace starts within oneself and only then can it be propelled outward.

Daraja Academy is located in central Kenya outside the town of Nanyuki, about four hours north of Nairobi, Kenya’s capitol city. A boarding secondary school, Daraja provides a quality education to Kenyan girls with top academy scores and exceptional leadership skills, but no means to continue their education past the primary level since secondary school is paired with high school fess in Kenya.

 

Mesret arrived at Daraja Academy with a hunger for education. A couple weeks prior, she approached her father to ask for assistance in paying for her school fees. Despite Mesret’s extraordinary academic scores, he refused. Coming from an area of unrest as many tribes fight over water and grazing land, Mesret yearned not only for an opportunity to continue her education, but also for the skills to bring peace to her community.

 

In addition to the demanding Kenyan curriculum, Daraja students have an additional class once a week called WISH class. WISH stands for Women of Integrity, Strength, and Hope. With four years comprising three terms each, Daraja girls focus on a wide variety of subjects in WISH.

 

During WISH class in her first term in secondary school, Mesret defined what “Integrity,” “Strength,” and “Hope” each mean to her and what role she wants each of those values to play in her life.

 

Mesret explains, “I am a woman of integrity, I work with the strength that is in my heart, and I have hope for the future of my community.”

 

By year two, Mesret engaged in lessons about topics such as culture, community, gender stereotypes and more. She felt more confident both in and out of the classroom and became a natural leader as peers frequently approached her as someone that they could rely on for help and encouragement.

 

As a current third year student, Mesret is utilizing the confidence she has built and the self worth she has developed to apply the knowledge that she’s gained from inside the classroom to learn about leadership, conflict resolution, and peace building in WISH class.

 

“WISH this term is really exciting because I get to learn about something that I am really interested in. I want to bring what I learn back to my community,” Mesret reports.

Next year, WISH class will continue to give Mesret the tools that she can use to utilize her education to positively transform her community. She will learn about teaching, social justice, tools for social change, and stress management among many other skills and topics.

 

Although it is powerful, educating girls isn’t just about giving a girl a pen and a notebook. It is about investing in her, and teaching her that she can be more than a wife or a housekeeper. It is about giving her the tools to make the difference that she thinks needs to be made. It is about trusting her and letting her fly.

 

To learn more about The Daraja Academy of Kenya, visit www.daraja-academy.org.

Being a Girl: Thoughts from a 7-year-old NYC Girl

New York, USA 2013

"What does it mean to be a girl?"

“What does it mean to be a girl?”

A few weeks ago I asked my seven-year-old American daughter to draw “what it means to be a girl.”

“What do you mean, ‘what it means to be a girl?’” she asked me.  “There are many ways to be a girl.”

“I know.”  I told her.  “But I want to know what it means for you.”

So she drew this, and I was captivated.

For her, “being a girl” means “being yourself.”  It means loving snarky fiction, junk food, pop culture, animals, and action. Knowing her, I know this assertion – and her selection of objects – reflects a pride and a struggle to be authentic in a sea of gendered expectations.

But, like any parent, my child’s assertions tend to captivate me in different ways; this one fills me with wonder, and it makes me worry.  The wonder is personal; not likely of interest beyond our circle.  The worry, however, is social; likely reflecting our moment in time, place, and space: What does it mean that, even as children, Americans tend to experience gender nonconformity in purely individual terms?  What does it mean that, like adults, American children often express gender – and gender nonconformity – through dichotomized consumption?

For now, though, at her seven years, I’ll return to the wonder.