Tag Archives: Girls Learn International

Day 6 – Solidarity With Girls

Girls Learn International

Day 6: Girls Learn International #SolidarityWithGirls
Tell us how you show #SolidarityWithGirls by Tweeting @girlslearnintl and posting pictures of you and your friends doing the #SolidarityWithGirls photo activity on social media! Invite friends in your network to join in to raise awareness for girls’ rights. #IDG2016 #11DaysofAction

Join our Twitter Chat 4-5pm ET @GirlsLearnIntl @IDG_Summitsoemi-photavath_solidaritywithgirls_photo-activity-1

“I Show #SolidarityWithGirls By…” Photo & Social Media Activity:
Step 1: Download and print the “I show #SolidarityWithGirls by…” poster by going to bit.ly/SolidarityWithGirls or write this phrase on a small chalkboard or dry erase board.

Step 2: Have students around your school fill in their amarisa-sinclair_gli_solidaritywithgirls_photo-activitynswer to the question and take their picture holding their response. Make sure you get their consent to post the photo on social media.

Step 3: From your GLI Chapter or personal Twitter account, upload your #SolidarityWithGirls image and Tweet your photo @girlslearnintl and @IDG_Summit on October 6th.

Step 4: During the Twitter Chat, respond to the questions centered on how you show solidarity, support, and friendship with girls!

Step 5: Post your photos to your Instagram or additional social media accounts for #IDG2016 on October 11th, and don’t forget to tag @girlslearnintl so we can repost them!

Lizzy Reflects on the Girls Speak Out at the United Nations

Lizzy at SpkOutFor the Girls Speak Out on October 11th, six girl activists from around the world, ages thirteen to seventeen, shared their inspirational stories and projects. I had the unique opportunity to hear these stories first hand as a representative of Girls Learn International and Girl Advocate for the Working Group on Girls. In fact, I helped to moderate the discussion for the Girls Speak Out. Here are my thoughts about that powerful day, IDG2013:

Eighth-grader Sophie talked about teaching swimming lessons for three years with the Mariposa Foundation on the Northern Coast of the Dominican Republic. Giving girls in this coastal community the opportunity to swim allowed them to get jobs, save lives, and change their social status. Seventeen-year old Diana talked about immigrating to the United States at a young age with her family, crossing a desert for three days with little food or water. Her personal triumph and activism in the New York State Youth Leadership Council shone a light on the deeply unfair immigrants policies. As she said herself, with a power that was startling and amazing, “I am undocumented, unafraid, and unapologetic”.

Fourteen-year-old Malika from Burkina Faso shared how she raised thousands of dollars to buy bikes that help girls safely travel to and from school in her community. Yeimy from Guatemala talked about her grassroots activism within her community – working to bring increased government attention and aid to girls’ education and teenage pregnancy. Claudia from Mozambique spoke about the awareness she raised in her community about human rights and girls’ education. Nesserine and Sihem from Algeria talked about the organization they founded to help more girls go to school within their community.

Speak Out PassAs more and more girls spoke, more and more respondents (Ambassadors, Executive Directors, and High-Level UN officials) became speechless in the wake of such powerful and personal testimonies. I had heard all their stories before in rehearsal, but there was something different in the way the girls were speaking on that day. There was more urgency in their voices, more insistence.

I hear UN officials say at every event that they know investing in girls is important. That they know it changes the world. That they, and their respective governments or organizations, are working to help girls. As great as these public speeches are, girls worldwide get a pitiful amount of international aid: 1%. 1% of all international aid.

The discrepancy between words and actions deny girls worldwide their human rights.

GLI Chapter at SPK OutBut the girl activists at the Girls Speak Out wanted action. They had already worked within their communities to help empower and educate girls. As they spoke about their own issues, programs, organizations, and activism, it became clear that it is girls who are the experts on girls’ rights. The Girls Speak Out showed that girls are the solution. Girls have the unique perspective of actually being girls. They need to be part of the conversation.

On this International Day of the Girl, they were.

 

Girls Learn International Celebrates IDG2013

GLI IDG 2013The Girls Learn International Chapter at The Grier School celebrated IDG2013 with a school-wide spirit day! Students and teachers wore pink and blue to symbolize gender equality – and almost everyone in the school participated!

Chapter members created a bulletin board with facts about women’s rights and human rights from around the world. They also prepared a script for Grier School history teachers to share with students about IDG2013.

Thanks to all of the girls and faculty at The Grier School for celebrating the power of girls! Together, we are changing the world.