Day 2 – What Counts For Girls

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The world’s 1.1 billion girls are part of a large and vibrant global generation poised to take on the future. But there is gap in our understanding about girls’ lives and what girls need to succeed in their communities. That’s why UNICEF is calling on the global community to collect, identify, and track progress for girls. Girls Progress = Goals Progress #GirlData! 

UNICEF engaged over 2,000,000 young U-Reporters across 30 countries to end violence against girls. Nearly 1,500,000 reported that violence against girls is a problem in their community and 100,000 U-Reporters are acting in their community to stop this violence. Join UNICEF and IDG_Summit in celebrating #IDG2016 and demand #GirlData to show progress for girls in achieving #goal5 Help make progress for girls.
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On 8 June 2016, Aber Beatrice, 5, photographed in the restaurant that her mother owns in Magri, South Sudan. “Can you write your name?” Aber asked, “and hers, and hers,” making sure all the names were written down. Then she gave her mother’s telephone number, which she wanted to show she could recall from memory. “I can write my own name, and my mother’s” and then proceeded to put them in the note book. Born in South Sudan just before independence, her family had returned from exile in Uganda where her father had met her mother. Ida spoke with the type of confidence we had discovered in Aber, and an even brighter smile when she spoke of Ida’s future. From the income of the small family restaurant Ida sends Aber to school, and hopes she will even go to university overseas once she has finished high school. “I want to be a doctor” Aber says, and then adds “to help the people here in Magri. We have a doctor in Magri. His name is David. He is a very nice man.”

On 8 June 2016, Aber Beatrice, 5, photographed in the restaurant that her mother owns in Magri, South Sudan.
“Can you write your name?” Aber asked, “and hers, and hers,” making sure all the names were written down. Then she gave her mother’s telephone number, which she wanted to show she could recall from memory. “I can write my own name, and my mother’s” and then proceeded to put them in the note book. Born in South Sudan just before independence, her family had returned from exile in Uganda where her father had met her mother. Ida spoke with the type of confidence we had discovered in Aber, and an even brighter smile when she spoke of Ida’s future. From the income of the small family restaurant Ida sends Aber to school, and hopes she will even go to university overseas once she has finished high school. “I want to be a doctor” Aber says, and then adds “to help the people here in Magri. We have a doctor in Magri. His name is David. He is a very nice man.”